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Harry Morgan

Harry Morgan

Birthday: 10 April 1915, Detroit, Michigan, USA
Birth Name: Harry Bratsberg
Height: 168 cm

Harry Morgan was a prolific character actor who starred in over 100 films and was a stage performer. Known to a younger generation of fans as "Col. Sherman T. Potter" on M*A*S*H (1972). Also ...Show more

Harry Morgan
[In 1977] It might be good for a holiday show, but I don't imagine it will be a real ratings-getter. [In 1977] It might be good for a holiday show, but I don't imagine it will be a real ratings-getter.
[on his concerns about replacing McLean Stevenson on M*A*S*H (1972)] After all, I was replacing a gr Show more [on his concerns about replacing McLean Stevenson on M*A*S*H (1972)] After all, I was replacing a great comic, McLean Stevenson, and entering a company that had been close-knit for three seasons. Hide
[about the cast of M*A*S*H (1972)] It's amazing how attached we've become. [about the cast of M*A*S*H (1972)] It's amazing how attached we've become.
[Who vehemently responded in 1996 of his arrest]: I didn't batter my wife! [Who vehemently responded in 1996 of his arrest]: I didn't batter my wife!
[in 1985, about something he once told President Ronald Reagan] I once lived in the White House for Show more [in 1985, about something he once told President Ronald Reagan] I once lived in the White House for four days in the Presidential quarters. Well, before I get arrested, I had better tell you that NBC did sort of a maxi-series called Backstairs at the White House (1979) and I played President [Harry S. Truman]. We didn't have a Rose Garden. But then, they never promised us a rose garden. Hide
[In 1975] For some reason, I'm confused with Henry Morgan. Perhaps the M*A*S*H (1972) series will ch Show more [In 1975] For some reason, I'm confused with Henry Morgan. Perhaps the M*A*S*H (1972) series will change that situation. Hide
[In 2004]: For being a fairly pleasant person and for having gotten along for the most part with a l Show more [In 2004]: For being a fairly pleasant person and for having gotten along for the most part with a lot of the people I've worked with. And for having a wonderful life and for having enjoyed practically every minute of it, especially in the picture business and on the stage. I think I'm one of the luckiest people in the world. Hide
[About his years on series in TV before he got M*A*S*H (1972)] Television allowed me to kick the Hol Show more [About his years on series in TV before he got M*A*S*H (1972)] Television allowed me to kick the Hollywood habit of typing an actor in certain roles. "M*A*S*H" was so damned good, I didn't think they could keep the level so high, but they have. I think this season's shows have been outstanding. Hide
[on M*A*S*H (1972) co-star Larry Linville] We were all fond of Larry, but when we moved onto the set Show more [on M*A*S*H (1972) co-star Larry Linville] We were all fond of Larry, but when we moved onto the set, no one was fond of Frank Burns. He was nothing like Larry in the flesh. He was brilliant in that part. Hide
[Who compared Blacke's Magic (1986) with Murder, She Wrote (1984)]: The endings where all the pieces Show more [Who compared Blacke's Magic (1986) with Murder, She Wrote (1984)]: The endings where all the pieces fall into place, are hard to make consistent. It's true on Murder, She Wrote (1984), and it's true on our show, too. Hide
[Of his M*A*S*H (1972) character] He was firm. He was a good officer and he had a good sense of humo Show more [Of his M*A*S*H (1972) character] He was firm. He was a good officer and he had a good sense of humor. I think it's the best part I ever had. I loved playing Colonel Potter. Hide
I could never afford to go back to New York and the theater, what with a big family. I didn't really Show more I could never afford to go back to New York and the theater, what with a big family. I didn't really start out to be an actor. I just sort of fell into it. I've had a good career, a lot of laughs. I don't know if that's enough, but it beats coal mining. Hide
[In 1976] A lot of people live much more simply than in the old days. That doesn't bother me. Keepin Show more [In 1976] A lot of people live much more simply than in the old days. That doesn't bother me. Keeping busy is the problem. Television guest shot fees are going down. You can do a dozen guest shots a year, but you're not making that much money. Hide
[on the death of his dog, Sterling]: He was a very special dog. [on the death of his dog, Sterling]: He was a very special dog.
Loretta Swit called me from London, I think she's probably my best friend. She didn't even call coll Show more Loretta Swit called me from London, I think she's probably my best friend. She didn't even call collect. Hide
I've never been more comfortable in a part than with Colonel Potter. I've never been more comfortable in a part than with Colonel Potter.
[on Ron Howard]: He's never hired me. I guess I didn't treat him well. He's very good, incidentally. [on Ron Howard]: He's never hired me. I guess I didn't treat him well. He's very good, incidentally.
[on how he got along with the other actors on M*A*S*H (1972)] They weren't fearful of competition, a Show more [on how he got along with the other actors on M*A*S*H (1972)] They weren't fearful of competition, and they handed you some of the juiciest things in the show. Hide
[on the cancellation of M*A*S*H (1972)] I think it broke all the listening, the tuning in records of Show more [on the cancellation of M*A*S*H (1972)] I think it broke all the listening, the tuning in records of "You doing it", it was a wonderful show. At the end of the show, we all said farewell to one another. I rode off on my horse, and they all stood up and saluted me, which was very unusual, it didn't have that kind of visible respect for the colonel . . . although it was there, but it wasn't demonstrated formally. It was touching, and it was more than just a film, this was it. So, I mean, what you were doing was really happening, going to happen, because it was a very profound moment. I think we all felt that because it was hard to say goodbye to "M*A*S*H". I could've done it for another 10 years, but I think most of the people felt the same way, maybe not Alan [Alan Alda]. He had other fish to fry. Most of us have gone on to anything after "M*A*S*H" . . . I don't think Alan has his. All he's done is nature shows, that's natural. Hide
[In 1986] The only ones in town who were moving office equipment in the teeth of the Depression were Show more [In 1986] The only ones in town who were moving office equipment in the teeth of the Depression were the people selling filing cabinets to the Social Security Administration. Hide
[In 1978, of his M*A*S*H (1972) co-star Gary Burghoff's talking about leaving the show] I'm sure he Show more [In 1978, of his M*A*S*H (1972) co-star Gary Burghoff's talking about leaving the show] I'm sure he means it, even though CBS doesn't. And I think it'll be harder to replace him than it was to replace McLean Stevenson, Wayne Rogers or Larry Linville. Gary's character is special. And, also, he's the only true original among us, since he's the only one from picture [MASH (1970)]. He'll sorely be missed. Hide
An actor's most important responsibility is to know lines well. An actor's most important responsibility is to know lines well.
[in 1983, about his wife Eileen Dutchon and his After MASH (1983) co-star, Barbara Townsend] Eileen Show more [in 1983, about his wife Eileen Dutchon and his After MASH (1983) co-star, Barbara Townsend] Eileen looks a lot like Townsend, and the two women get along pretty well, but I sit between them so as not to take any chances. Hide
[on replacing McLean Stevenson for the last 8 seasons of M*A*S*H (1972)] And he wouldn't leave that Show more [on replacing McLean Stevenson for the last 8 seasons of M*A*S*H (1972)] And he wouldn't leave that behind, so I had to start from scratch. Hide
[When his role as "Col. Sherman Potter" ended] I'm feeling very sad and sentimental. I don't know if Show more [When his role as "Col. Sherman Potter" ended] I'm feeling very sad and sentimental. I don't know if M*A*S*H (1972) made me a better actor, but I know it made me a better human being. Hide
[on his on- and off-screen chemistry with Hal Linden, who played Alex Blacke]: They tell me there's Show more [on his on- and off-screen chemistry with Hal Linden, who played Alex Blacke]: They tell me there's good chemistry, between us, and that's important - witness M*A*S*H (1972). They even had a chemist from UCLA come over to test the show. Hide
[on his popularity while playing the 60-something Col. Sherman T. Potter on M*A*S*H (1972)] Two guys Show more [on his popularity while playing the 60-something Col. Sherman T. Potter on M*A*S*H (1972)] Two guys just waved to me and said, "Hi, Colonel", as I was coming to the hotel lobby. Hide
[Of Jack Webb, who worked with him on Dragnet 1967 (1967)'s very first episode, which Webb's charact Show more [Of Jack Webb, who worked with him on Dragnet 1967 (1967)'s very first episode, which Webb's character did psychedelic drugs]: He's been taking them, the pills, all day. He kept saying he wants to get even farther out. Hide
[on the death of Jack Webb] Jack had a lot of affection in him. He'd always throw his arms around me Show more [on the death of Jack Webb] Jack had a lot of affection in him. He'd always throw his arms around me. My God, off-screen he was the most garrulous person you ever met - full of life and laughs. We had a ball . . . I loved him very much. Hide
[In 1979, after having spent a few seasons on M*A*S*H (1972)] I think I'm a lot looser now, less mil Show more [In 1979, after having spent a few seasons on M*A*S*H (1972)] I think I'm a lot looser now, less military. There's much more of a flow between me and the other characters now. It's good. We have so much fun sitting around off-camera that it really doesn't change when we get on-camera. There's a lot of affection flowing around there. Hide
I didn't have enough money to go back east, so I stayed around, finding jobs mainly out of friendshi Show more I didn't have enough money to go back east, so I stayed around, finding jobs mainly out of friendships. I played a lot of sheriffs in those years. Hide
[Asked if he felt that M*A*S*H (1972) had started to suffer in later months] No one connected with i Show more [Asked if he felt that M*A*S*H (1972) had started to suffer in later months] No one connected with it will be able to stand its being less than it was. I'm sure they'd rather leave than hang around and watch quality go down. Hide
I was particularly fond of Dick Boone [Richard Boone]. I started to direct with him. I was particularly fond of Dick Boone [Richard Boone]. I started to direct with him.
[If he was worried about the cast reaction to his replacing McLean Stevenson on M*A*S*H (1972)] Our Show more [If he was worried about the cast reaction to his replacing McLean Stevenson on M*A*S*H (1972)] Our relationships just get deeper and deeper the longer I'm with the show. Hide
[In 1980, about joining M*A*S*H (1972) in its fourth season] I've always been with a show from the b Show more [In 1980, about joining M*A*S*H (1972) in its fourth season] I've always been with a show from the beginning, but this was easier than starting some of those shows from the beginning. Hide
[on Alan Alda]: Alan came back to the set like a real basket case. Though he always doesn't fly home Show more [on Alan Alda]: Alan came back to the set like a real basket case. Though he always doesn't fly home to his family in New Jersey on weekends anymore, doesn't go when he's writing. I'd think he'd be exhausted. He must be, I guess. Hide
I don't care about the money. I'm just interested in the perks. I'll do a series if I am picked up b Show more I don't care about the money. I'm just interested in the perks. I'll do a series if I am picked up by a limo, work only until 4, and the show is shot in Hawaii. Hide
Harry Morgan's FILMOGRAPHY
as Actor (46)
123Movies